Video 31 Jul 4,275 notes

(Source: foxinu)

Video 31 Jul 39,450 notes

pineplapple:

This is hands down the best parody twitter ever

Photo 31 Jul 425 notes happyjarcomic:

(via Happy Jar - Physical)
Video 31 Jul 1,186 notes

5x05 // 7x07

(Source: copyofclara)

Photo 31 Jul 247 notes
Video 31 Jul 80,593 notes
via huh..
Video 31 Jul 9,430 notes

(Source: brienneoftarth)

Video 30 Jul 1,327 notes
Photo 30 Jul 362,798 notes nickcopper:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.
My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.
My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.
My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.
My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.
My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.
My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.
The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

Smart students intimidate teachers because they have so many students they need to keep in line. If one is rebellious they all become rebellious and they lose their jobs. Teachers are terrified of smart students because they don’t know how to teach them and they could lose their jobs. Bad teachers, and inexperienced, or ignorant teachers believe this. It isn’t the system itself, it’s the teachers in question.

That last comment (nickcopper) is completely uninformed, so let me share something about the school system. There are some bad teachers in the system, no doubt. In the American school system (and to an extent the Canadian one as well - I cannot speak with any knowledge to the systems in other countries), it’s quite hard to get rid of the “bad teachers” due to union laws & how their hiring & retention processes work. They won’t “lose their jobs because students rebel”, though the “bad teachers” do tend to get shuffled between schools - which of course doesn’t really help. 
It’s the statement that it is a teacher issue and not a system issue that’s the problem here. It’s a system issue. A HUGE system issue. The school system is set up in such a way that teachers HAVE to structure their curricula to set tests. The teachers don’t set the tests, often they have very little say in what is on them (many are set by outside, private financial backing, and that’s a whole other terrifying snakepit of issues). But the teachers still have to teach to the test - because if their students do poorly on those standardized tests, their school loses funding. And if the school loses funding, there are even less resources for them to work with, even less they can do for their students. Good teachers are bound by the system, and bad teachers are protected by the system. Tell me how this isn’t a system issue?
In my experience, many teachers hate the system as much as their students do, and sometimes more. What sucks is when that bleeds into their teaching, and therefore into their students’ education. Teachers aren’t intimidated by smart students, unless they are truly terrible teachers. Good teachers love smart students. 
Fight the problems, fight the system, be vocal about your experience, but recognize your teachers as human beings, many of whom are struggling with the issue too. Otherwise you are doing yourself no favours, and the system will never change. 
(In the picture above, not to defend it, but if the teacher is unable to prove that Aidan can print in 1st grade, because he keeps writing in cursive, guess who isn’t meeting the standard evaluation criteria? It’s awful, but it’s true.) 
TL;DR

nickcopper:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.

My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.

My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.

My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.

My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.

My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.

My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.

The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

Smart students intimidate teachers because they have so many students they need to keep in line. If one is rebellious they all become rebellious and they lose their jobs. Teachers are terrified of smart students because they don’t know how to teach them and they could lose their jobs. Bad teachers, and inexperienced, or ignorant teachers believe this. It isn’t the system itself, it’s the teachers in question.

That last comment (nickcopper) is completely uninformed, so let me share something about the school system. There are some bad teachers in the system, no doubt. In the American school system (and to an extent the Canadian one as well - I cannot speak with any knowledge to the systems in other countries), it’s quite hard to get rid of the “bad teachers” due to union laws & how their hiring & retention processes work. They won’t “lose their jobs because students rebel”, though the “bad teachers” do tend to get shuffled between schools - which of course doesn’t really help. 

It’s the statement that it is a teacher issue and not a system issue that’s the problem here. It’s a system issue. A HUGE system issue. The school system is set up in such a way that teachers HAVE to structure their curricula to set tests. The teachers don’t set the tests, often they have very little say in what is on them (many are set by outside, private financial backing, and that’s a whole other terrifying snakepit of issues). But the teachers still have to teach to the test - because if their students do poorly on those standardized tests, their school loses funding. And if the school loses funding, there are even less resources for them to work with, even less they can do for their students. Good teachers are bound by the system, and bad teachers are protected by the system. Tell me how this isn’t a system issue?

In my experience, many teachers hate the system as much as their students do, and sometimes more. What sucks is when that bleeds into their teaching, and therefore into their students’ education. Teachers aren’t intimidated by smart students, unless they are truly terrible teachers. Good teachers love smart students. 

Fight the problems, fight the system, be vocal about your experience, but recognize your teachers as human beings, many of whom are struggling with the issue too. Otherwise you are doing yourself no favours, and the system will never change. 

(In the picture above, not to defend it, but if the teacher is unable to prove that Aidan can print in 1st grade, because he keeps writing in cursive, guess who isn’t meeting the standard evaluation criteria? It’s awful, but it’s true.) 

TL;DR

Link 30 Jul 183 notes A real display of horse and rider trust of the day »

donnerhall-darling:

image

One of the most extraordinary clear rounds of the Prix du Qatar came from Gregory Wathelet (BEL), whose mount Conrad de Hus managed to dislodge his bridle part way round. As the pair jumped the third to last fence, the bridle fell off mid-air, momentarily obscuring…

I wish people would stop glorifying this ride. If the bridle had come off altogether and they finished the round bridleless, I would agree and this would be stunning. But the bridle was dangling, as can be clearly seen, in a way that his horse could have put a leg through it while jumping, caught a boot in it, or at the very least it could have obscured the horse’s vision enough that he could misjudge a fence and crash. The fact that he chose to continue his round with such a safety hazard, willing to risk his horse, is appalling. They could have both died. He should have pulled up. This is NOT “an incredible show of horsemanship”. It’s an incredible show of idiocy. 

(and the excuse that I’ve heard is that the bridle came off because “the horse has small ears” ??? um, what?)


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